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PV

January 9th, 2017

MUTRAW DISTRICT, Karen State, Myanmar – The Salween Peace Park, an indigenous Karen landscape conservation initiative dedicated to the conservation of bio-cultural and ecological diversity in one of Southeast Asia’s last greatest natural landscapes, has made a major step toward reality. Following a public referendum, a draft charter for the Salween Peace Park, memorializing the inalienable right to self-determination, and local governance of indigenous Karen over their ancestral land, was completed and received wide support.

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TNI

A commentary by Nang Shining
16 December 2016 Article
Amidst the many challenges Myanmar now faces, the threats to the environment are urgent – and they are growing more extreme. The situation is especially serious in the case of mega dams and hydropower where a host of projects are being promoted, without appropriate planning or public consultation, that are likely to cause irreversible harm to communities and natural ecosystems around the country. Not only are many of the projects located in nationality areas that are conflict zones, but the bulk of the energy produced will also be exported to neighbouring countries.

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MYANMAR TIMES

By Pianporn Deetes | Monday, 12 December 2016

At the end of November, China’s National Energy Administration published its Hydropower Development Plan for the next five years (2016-2020). In a noticeable turnaround from the last plan, the roadmap – which identifies river basins where further hydropower projects will be built – no longer includes any dams on the upper section of the Nu/Salween River in China. This is a major reversal from government plans in 2013 to build five dams on the upper section of the river. It signals an important victory for the scientists and environmental groups in China who have worked for over a decade to document the biodiversity found along the Nu River and make a case for preserving one of the last free-flowing transnational rivers in Asia.

Voices of the Dammed

Development in Burma