News

WION

Delhi, India Aug 23, 2017, 03.15 PM (IST) Rajesh Singh

A few days ago, the Indian External Affairs Ministry spokesperson informed that China had not shared hydrological data with India on the Himalayan rivers this year. He sought to downplay the development by explaining that “sometimes, due to some certain technical reasons data is not shared”. He was clueless about the “technical reasons” and said he would be better equipped on the issue once the information was received from the “relevant ministry”. The spokesperson's valiant effort to mute the issue may be understandable, given that the government would not like to indulge in the provocation at the backdrop of the ongoing India-China standoff at Doklam. But there is no running away from the significance of Beijing’s action.

THE DIPLOMAT

Energy demand in the country is expected to soar over the next decades. Can Myanmar keep the lights on?

By Amara Thiha | August 04, 2017

Myanmar’s high growth in electricity demand — rising by around 13 percent annually — is a challenge for the government. Demand is estimated to reach 4,500 MW by 2020 and 13,410 MW in 2030. Currently there is no plan to meet this high demand.

FRONTIER MYANMAR

Tuesday, August 01, 2017
The future of the Myitsone Dam grabs headlines but attention also needs to be paid to a series of massive dams planned for the Thanlwin River.

By JULIAN KIRCHHERR & MATTHEW J WALTON

IN JULY 1997, the heads of the Thai and Myanmar governments sat down to sign a Memorandum of Understanding with far-reaching implications for Myanmar. The MoU outlined the construction of seven hydropower dams to be built on the Thanlwin River, also known as the Salween. The projects were supposed to feature a total capacity of 22,000 megawatts – 55 percent of Myanmar’s total hydroelectric potential and almost five times the total capacity installed today.

WWF

A GLOBAL WWF PROJECT THAT'S COMBINING BIG PARTNERSHIPS WITH BIGGER DATA TO MAP AND PROTECT THE WORLD'S LAST FREE-FLOWING RIVERS
ISSUE: Fall 2017 | AUTHOR: Erin Waite

It’s just before dusk, and the sun casts gold flourishes on the slow ripples of the Potomac River. Trekking through underbrush along the riverbank, Michele Thieme pauses to survey the scene.

Read Full Story At: https://www.worldwildlife.org/magazine/issues/fall-2017/articles/a-river-runs-through

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