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Nepal can work with China and India to develop river management infrastructure
- Pramod Aryal

Feb 16, 2017- Nepal, China, and India have witnessed civilisations with diverse religions, cultures and heritages growing in harmony but with a brutal history of colonisation followed by periodic shocks. Moreover, the new global order of the 21st century makes it prudent for these great civilisations to work to harness the embedded potentials for coexistence. Thus, diplomacy has to evolve where peace and harmony is paramount. The Nepal-China Think Tank Conference held in Kathmandu with 14 Chinese members including political and infrastructure experts that coincided with the Raisaina-Observer Research Foundation Conference held in Delhi with three Chinese academicians could have been good gesture.

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THE NATION

February 14, 2017 01:00
By Tom Fawthrop
Special to The Nation
Will it bring economic benefits or will the losses outweigh the gains?

Down the ages the mighty Mekong has beguiled explorers and locals alike with its swirling rapids, rocky inlets and dotted islets. Currents, reefs and rocks have repeatedly thwarted attempts at smooth navigation since French colonial times.

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NEW MANDALA

LIU YUN - 31 JAN, 2017
Decision to stop controversial Chinese-backed project should not be taken as a ‘watershed’ moment in Myanmar’s march to democracy, writes Liu Yun.

In his short but influential book, The Whig Interpretation of History, British historian Herbert Butterfield coined the term “Whig history”, which denounced a long held English view of the past as a steady march to greater liberty, enlightenment and progress.

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Posted By: SHAN on: January 27, 2017

Leading Burmese environmental groups, including Burma Rivers Network (BRN) and Save the Salween Network (SSN), today released a statement, voicing strong opposition to the International Finance Corporation (IFC), which they say is currently promoting various hydropower projects in areas that are primarily conflict zones.

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THE DIPLOMAT

China is preserving the ecology of the Nu River within its borders. Downstream in Myanmar, it’s a different story.

By Tom Fawthrop
January 28, 2017

China’s recent decision to exclude the Nu River in China (also known as the Upper Salween) from their dam-building program highlights Beijing’s contradictory support for dam projects downstream in the ethnic states of Myanmar.

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Voices of the Dammed

Development in Burma